A MULTI-FAITH NETWORK
COMMITTED TO ACTION
ON CLIMATE CHANGE

Introducing ARRCC

The Australian Religious Response to Climate Change (ARRCC) is a multi-faith network taking action on the most pressing issue of our time. In the face of ecological damage and social injustices, we affirm our love for this planet and its inhabitants and our deep reverence for life.

Latest News

Faith leaders: leave fossil fuels out of public funds

14 Nov 2016

Australian faith leaders join growing call for urgent climate action, challenge to sovereign wealth and super funds: sever fossil fuel investments 

Dalai Lama and Desmond Tutu among top religious leaders to declare continued use of fossil fuels ethically untenable

Leaders from faith traditions across the world including Australia are calling for massive divestment of government-controlled investments from fossil fuels into renewable energy and support for the poor and those most vulnerable to climate change. This would affect government superannuation funds and sovereign wealth funds like the Future Fund.   

 

Interfaith Statement & Islamic divestment media release

Media Release, 11 November, 2016

 Faith Leaders Challenge Sovereign Wealth and Pension Funds: Sever Trillions in Fossil Fuel Investments

Dalai Lama and Desmond Tutu among top religious leaders to declare continued use of fossil fuels ethically untenable

Australian faith leaders join call for urgent action 

Sydney, November 11 — Leaders from global faith groups, financial institutions and foundations called on sovereign wealth and superannuation funds to rapidly end trillions in investments related to fossil fuels and invest in renewable energy in line with the Paris Agreement.

COP22 Interfaith Statement & social media

We invite all people of faith and goodwill to sign the COP22 Interfaith Climate Statement 

We all desire for a safer future, free from climate change.  Confronting this crisis is the great moral imperative of our time. It requires urgent, transformative action to slow (and hopefully reverse) the acceleration of global warming that is now underway. People of faith and goodwill have an important role to play in showing the way forward on this moral imperative. Faiths also play an important role in as we grieve our losses and practice hope. Together, we can make a difference!

Please join in:

  • adding your name to the COP22 Interfaith Climate Statement that will be presented to the international climate change talks in Marrakech in November. 
  • spreading the word about the Statement and asking others to sign it.

COP22 people's social media campaign

Social media campaign

Wish you were in Marrakech, Morocco, outside the COP22 climate negotiations? Want your voice heard? Be part of a global campaign to impress on negotiators that the world must act at emergency speed to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. They are attuned to what is happening on social media, so this campaign is convey the voices of ordinary people who want to see action escalated.

ARRCC joins push for renewables, opposition to gas

Members and friends of ARRCC turned out for the snap rally in Canberra on Friday, August 19th, in front of COAG’s Energy Council meeting.  We were calling for urgent shift from fossil fuels to renewable energy.

Well over 100 people came from diverse community groups. 

#PrayForOurPacific

Your faith community could be involved in this gentle, prayerful, hopeful action to address climate change.

#PrayForOurPacific Sabbath was initiated by some Christians in Fiji who are part of 350.org, a global movement acting on climate change. On the “front lines” of global warming, they are experiencing firsthand the impacts of sea level rise, ocean acidification, drought and intensified storms. They also know the power of prayer and the power of hope to drive action on climate change. 

ARRCC media release Laudato Si anniversary

Encyclical anniversary sparks religious call to shift from fossil fuels

Today, on the anniversary of Pope Francis’ environmental encyclical, Laudato Si’, Australian religious leaders are collectively calling for an accelerated shift away from fossil fuels. In an election campaign where global warming has scarcely been mentioned, they are calling for it to be a top priority.

In an open letter which describes the bleaching of the Great Barrier Reef as a “wake-up call”, senior leaders from the major faith traditions say the approval of new coal mines near the Reef was “irresponsible”. Echoing the same concerns, heads of three Catholic Religious Orders are also announcing their decisions to divest from fossil fuels. 

ARRCC open letter before 2016 election

To those in public office or aspiring to it:

As leaders in a range of faith traditions, we draw attention to the wake-up call which the degradation of the Great Barrier Reef provides. 

The Reef is a wonder of the natural world and, to people of faith, a sign of the spiritual dimension of life. It also supports many jobs and economic benefits.

It is therefore with great sadness that we witness the irretrievable loss of parts of the Reef, principally due to global warming.

Prayer, practice and police

I am, if not preoccupied, at least seriously engaged with the question from the future: ‘What were you doing to try to stop the world from spiralling into ever increasing temperatures and violent weather patterns?’.  My faith impels me to repair the world, not destroy it. In fact it views humans as its caretakers, looking after God’s creation and passing it on in good condition to those who come after us (ie ‘sustainability’, millennia before the term was coined!).  So on Wednesday 18th May, I participated in a peaceful demonstration in Preston, at Bill Shorten’s constituency office, a part of the 350.org campaign to show worldwide concern for the need for dramatic and immediate action.  

Musings of a first time arrestee

On Mother’s Day, I found myself standing on a double railway line at a bridge over the Hunter River, wearing white overalls with a red X painted on the back like the other 60 or so people with me. We were waiting for the police to arrest us all, having declined their invitation to leave voluntarily.  The police didn’t seem in much of a hurry to do this, as they arranged and re-arranged the on-site processing set up they had brought. We were happy for them to take as long as they liked - it added to the time the coal trains were unable to bring their cargo to the Newcastle coal port.